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The most kick-ass dinosaur


velociraptor

2015-01-06

these things are vicious





tyrannosaurus rex

2015-01-06

everybody knows it's this guy...





pterodactyl

2015-01-06

his plumage is the best in town





barney

2015-01-06

the big purple dinosaur





Utahraptor

2015-07-01

Utahraptor (meaning "Utah's predator" [1]) is a genus of theropod dinosaurs. It contains a single species, Utahraptor ostrommaysorum, which is the largest known member of the family Dromaeosauridae. Fossil specimens date to the upper Barremian stage of the early Cretaceous period (in rock strata dated to 126 ± 2.5 million years ago). [2]





Tyrannosaurus

2015-07-01

Tyrannosaurus (/tɨˌrænəˈsɔrəs/ or /taɪˌrænəˈsɔrəs/ ("tyrant lizard", from the Ancient Greek tyrannos (τύραννος), "tyrant", and sauros (σαῦρος), "lizard" [1])) is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Tyrannosaurus lived throughout what is now western North America, which then was an island continent named Laramidia. Tyrannosaurus had a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 68 to 66 million years ago. [2] It was the last known member of the tyrannosaurids, [3] and among the last non-avian dinosaurs, to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event.





Triceratops

2015-07-01

Triceratops is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that first appeared during the late Maastrichtian stage of the late Cretaceous period, about 68 million years ago (Mya) in what is now North America. It is one of the last known non-avian dinosaur genera, and became extinct in the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago. [1] The term Triceratops, which literally means "three-horned face", is derived from the Greek τρί- (tri-) meaning "three", κέρας (kéras) meaning "horn", and ὤψ (ops) meaning "face". [2] [3]





Stegosaurus

2015-07-01

Stegosaurus (/ˌstɛɡɵˈsɔrəs/, meaning "roof lizard" or "covered lizard" in reference to its bony plates [1]) is a genus of armored stegosaurid dinosaur. They lived during the Late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian), some 155 to 150 million years ago in what is now western North America. In 2006, a specimen of Stegosaurus was announced from Portugal, showing that they were present in Europe, as well. [2] Due to its distinctive tail spikes and plates, Stegosaurus is one of the most recognizable dinosaurs. At least three species have been identified in the upper Morrison Formation and are known from the remains of about 80 individuals. [3]





Spinosaurus

2015-07-01

Spinosaurus (meaning "spine lizard") is a genus of theropod dinosaur that lived in what now is North Africa, during the lower Albian to lower Cenomanian stages of the Cretaceous period, about 112 to 97 million years ago. This genus was known first from Egyptian remains discovered in 1912 and described by German paleontologist Ernst Stromer in 1915. The original remains were destroyed in World War II, but additional material has come to light in recent years. It is unclear whether one or two species are represented in the fossils reported in the scientific literature. The best known species is S. aegyptiacus from Egypt, although a potential second species, S. maroccanus, has been recovered from Morocco.





Rajasaurus

2015-07-01

Rajasaurus (meaning "king" or "king of lizards") is a genus of carnivorous abelisaurian theropod dinosaur with an unusual head crest. Between 1982 and 1984, its fossilized bones were discovered by Suresh Srivastava of the Geological Survey of India (GSI). Excavated from the Narmada River valley in Rahioli in the Kheda district of Gujarat, India, the find was announced as a new genus of dinosaur by American and Indian scientists on August 13, 2003. [1]





Quetzalcoatlus

2015-07-01

Quetzalcoatlus /kɛtsəlkoʊˈætləs/ was a pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It was a member of the Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl.





Pteranodon

2015-07-01

Pteranodon (/tɨˈrænədɒn/; from Greek πτερόν ("wing") and ἀνόδων ("toothless")) is a genus of pterosaurs which included some of the largest known flying reptiles, with wingspans over 6 metres (20 ft). It existed during the late Cretaceous geological period of North America (about 66 million years ago) in present day Kansas, Alabama, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota. More fossil specimens of Pteranodon have been found than any other pterosaur, with about 1,200 specimens known to science, many of them well preserved with nearly complete skulls and articulated skeletons. It was an important part of the animal community in the Western Interior Seaway. [1]





Plesiosaurus

2015-07-01

Plesiosaurus (Greek: πλησιος/plesios, near to + σαυρος/sauros, lizard) was a genus of large marine sauropterygian reptile that lived during the early part of the Jurassic Period, and is known by nearly complete skeletons from the Lias of England. Although there are a number of modern-day myths surrounding this order of creature, such as the myth of the Loch Ness Monster, these creatures are known to be extinct. It is distinguishable by its small head, long and slender neck, broad turtle-like body, a short tail, and two pairs of large, elongated paddles. It lends its name to the order Plesiosauria, of which it is an early, but fairly typical member. It contains only one species, Plesiosaurus dolichodeirus. P. brachypterygius, P. guilielmiiperatoris, and P. tournemirensis were assigned to new genera, Hydrorion, Seeleyosaurus and Occitanosaurus.





Phorusrhacid

2015-07-01

Phorusrhacids, colloquially known as terror birds, are an extinct clade of large carnivorous flightless birds that were the largest species of apex predators in South America during the Cenozoic, 62–2.5 million years (Ma) ago. [3]





Moschops

2015-07-01

Moschops (Greek for "calf face") is an extinct genus of therapsid that lived in the Guadalupian epoch, around 265–260 million years ago. Therapsids are synapsids, which were at one time the dominant land animals. Its remains were found in the Karoo region of South Africa.





Mapusaurus

2015-07-01





Liopleurodon

2015-07-01

Liopleurodon (/ˌlaɪ.ɵˈplʊərədɒn/; meaning 'smooth-sided teeth') is a genus of large, carnivorous marine reptile belonging to the Pliosauroidea, a clade of short-necked plesiosaurs. The two species of Liopleurodon lived during the Callovian stage of the Middle Jurassic Period (c. 160 to 155 mya). It was the apex predator of the Middle to Late Jurassic seas that covered Europe. The largest species, L. ferox, is estimated to have grown up to 6.39 meters (21.0 feet) in length. [1]





Kronosaurus

2015-07-01

Kronosaurus (/ˌkrɒnoʊˈsɔrəs/ KRON-o-SAWR-əs; meaning "lizard of Kronos") is an extinct genus of short-necked pliosaur. It was among the largest pliosaurs, and is named after the leader of the Greek Titans, Cronus. It lived in the Early Cretaceous Period (Aptian-Albian). [2] [3]





Ichthyosaurus

2015-07-01

Ichthyosaurus (derived from Greek ιχθυς/ichthys meaning 'fish' and σαυρος/sauros meaning 'lizard') is a genus of ichthyosaurs from the late Triassic and early Jurassic (Rhaetian - Pliensbachian [1]) of Europe (Belgium, England, Switzerland). and Asia (Indonesia). It is among the best known ichthyosaur genera, with the Order Ichthyosauria being named after it. [2] [3] [4] Ichthyosaurus was the first complete fossil to be discovered in the early 19th century by Mary Anning in England. [5]





Gorgosaurus

2015-07-01

Gorgosaurus (/ˌɡɔrɡɵˈsɔrəs/ GOR-go-SOR-əs; meaning "dreadful lizard") is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period, between about 76.6 and 75.1 million years ago. Fossil remains have been found in the Canadian province of Alberta and possibly the U.S. state of Montana. Paleontologists recognize only the type species, G. libratus, although other species have been erroneously referred to the genus.





Gorgonopsid

2015-07-01

Gorgonopsia ("Gorgon face") is an extinct suborder of therapsid synapsids. Like other therapsids, gorgonopsians (or gorgonopsids) were at one time called "mammal-like reptiles," as well as "stem mammals"





Giganotosaurus

2015-07-01

Giganotosaurus (/ˌdʒaɪɡəˌnoʊtəˈsɔrəs/ JY-gə--NOH-tə-SOR-əs [1] or GIG-ə-NOT-o-SAW-rus meaning "giant southern lizard" [2]) is a genus of carcharodontosaurid dinosaurs that lived in what is now Argentina during the early Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period, [3] approximately some 99.6 to 97 million years ago. [4] It included some of the largest known terrestrial carnivores, with known individuals equaling or slightly bigger than the size of the largest of the genera Tyrannosaurus and Carcharodontosaurus, but not as large as those of Spinosaurus.





Estemmenosuchus

2015-07-01

Estemmenosuchus (meaning "crowned crocodile" in Greek) is a genus of large, early omnivorous therapsid. It lived during the middle part of the Middle Permian around 267 million years ago. The two species, E. uralensis and E. mirabilis, are characterised by distinctive horn-like structures, which were probably used for intra-specific display. Both species of Estemmenosuchus are from the Perm (or Cis-Urals) region of Russia. Two other estemmenosuchids, Anoplosuchus and Zopherosuchus, are now considered females of the species E. uralensis. [1] There were many complete and incomplete skeletons found together.





Entelodon

2015-07-01

Entelodon (meaning "complete teeth", from Ancient Greek ἐντελής entelēs "complete" and ὀδών odōn "tooth", referring to its "complete" eutherian dentition [1]), is an extinct genus of entelodont artiodactyl endemic to Eurasia. Fossils of species are found in Paleogene strata ranging in age from the Houldjinian (37.2-33.9 mya) until the early Oligocene (33.9-28.4 mya). [2]





Dracorex

2015-07-01

Dracorex is a dinosaur genus of the family Pachycephalosauridae, from the Late Cretaceous of North America. The type (and only known) species is Dracorex hogwartsia, meaning "dragon king of Hogwarts". It is known from one nearly complete skull (the holotype TCMI 2004.17.1), as well as four cervical vertebrae: the atlas, third, eighth and ninth. These were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation in South Dakota by three amateur paleontologists from Sioux City, Iowa. The skull was subsequently donated to the Children's Museum of Indianapolis for study in 2004, and was formally described by Bob Bakker and Robert Sullivan in 2006. [1] However, Jack Horner et al. suspect that it is a juvenile Pachycephalosaurus and an analysis of pachycephalosaur fossils by a joint team from the University of California, Berkeley and the Museum of the Rockies has questioned the validity of two named genera of pachycephalosaur, Dracorex and Stygimoloch. According to the team, specimens of Dracorex and Stygimoloch might actually represent earlier growth stages of Pachycephalosaurus. As this article on the UC Berkeley website says, "The confusion is traced to their bizarre head ornaments, ranging from shields and domes to horns and spikes, which changed dramatically with age and sexual maturity, making the heads of youngsters look very different from those of adults." [2]





Carnotaurus

2015-07-01

Carnotaurus /ˌkɑrnɵˈtɔrəs/ is a genus of large theropod dinosaur that lived in South America during the Late Cretaceous period, between about 72 and 69.9 million years ago. The only species is Carnotaurus sastrei. Known from a single well-preserved skeleton, it is one of the best-understood theropods from the Southern Hemisphere. The skeleton, found in 1984, was uncovered in the Chubut Province of Argentina from rocks of the La Colonia Formation. Derived from the Latin carno [carnis] ("flesh") and taurus ("bull"), the name Carnotaurus means "meat-eating bull", alluding to its bull-like horns. Carnotaurus is a derived member of the Abelisauridae, a group of large theropods that occupied the large predatorial niche in the southern Landmasses of Gondwana during the late Cretaceous. The phylogenetic relations of Carnotaurus are uncertain; it may have been closer to either Majungasaurus or Aucasaurus.





Argentinosaurus

2015-07-01

Argentinosaurus (meaning "Argentine lizard" [1]) is a genus of titanosaur sauropod dinosaur first discovered by Guillermo Heredia in Argentina. The generic name refers to the country in which it was discovered. The dinosaur lived on the then-island continent of South America somewhere between 97 and 94 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Epoch. It is among the largest known dinosaurs.





Ankylosaurus

2015-07-01

Ankylosaurus (/ˌæŋkɨlɵˈsɔrəs/ ANG-ki-lo-SAWR-əs or /æŋˌkaɪlɵˈsɔrəs/ ang-KY-lo-SAWR-əs, meaning "fused lizard") is a genus of ankylosaurid dinosaur. Fossils of Ankylosaurus are found in geologic formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, between about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America. Ankylosaurus was named by Barnum Brown in 1908, and the only classified species in the genus is A. magniventris. Although a complete skeleton has not been discovered and other ankylosaurs are represented by more extensive fossil material, Ankylosaurus is often considered the archetypal member of the group.





Allosaurus

2015-07-01

Allosaurus /ˌælɵˈsɔrəs/ is a genus of large theropod dinosaur that lived 155 to 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian [1]). The name "Allosaurus" means "different lizard". It is derived from the Greek ἄλλος/allos ("different, other") and σαῦρος/sauros ("lizard / generic reptile"). The first fossil remains that can definitely be ascribed to this genus were described in 1877 by paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh, and it became known as Antrodemus. As one of the first well-known theropod dinosaurs, it has long attracted attention outside of paleontological circles. Indeed, it has been a top feature in several films and documentaries about prehistoric life.